The Bernese Mountain Dog Kennel

at Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, CANADA

Spaying and Neutering

By Diane Jermyn DOGS IN CANADA ANNUAL 2013

 

When to spay (for females) and neuter (for males) is another hot topic, especially for breeders and trainers who don't agree with the standard veterinary recommendation of sterilizing at six months of age.

Bernese Mountain Dog puppies at Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada Bernese Mountain Dog puppies at Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada Cape Bernese - The Bernese Mountain Dog Kennel at Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada Bernese Mountain Dog puppies at Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

Berrnese Mountain Dog Puppies sleeping

Bernese Mountain Dog puppies having a nap

Bernese Mountain Dog Senta

retired Bernese Mountain Dog Senta is watching over the Bras d'Or Lake

Bernese Mountain Dogs Moritz and Senta

our Bernese Mountain Dogs Moritz and Senta at our driveway

Bernese Mountain Dog puppies exploring

Bernese Mountain Dog puppies exploring water

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...in the heart of Cape Breton Island, at the Shore of the Bras d'Or Lake

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Spaying and Neutering

 

By Diane Jermyn DOGS IN CANADA ANNUAL 2013 Page 15


When to spay (for females) and neuter (for males) is another hot topic, especially for breeders and trainers who don't agree with the standard veterinary recommendation of sterilizing at six months of age.

Those opposed to early sterilization cite health issues such as urinary incontinence in spayed females and an Iowa State University study that demonstrated an increased risk for cardiac tumours for castrated males and particularly for spayed females.

Other dog owners worry about how sterilization can slow an animal's metabolism leading to serious weight gain and its related health issues.

However, most experts agree that sterilization - at the right time - not only helps control the flood of unwanted puppies that overwhelm animal shelters but that it's uniformly good for a dog's health and personality.

Behavioural studies have shown that neutering can prevent or significantly reduce the incidence of aggressive tendencies and undesirable habits such as roaming, humping and urine-marking.

Even with those benefits, experienced trainers and breeders can tell you that spaying or neutering too soon can leave the dog suspended in a "perpetual adolescence," meaning difficult behaviours can become more firmly entrenched.

This is why it's crucial to research and find out the optimal time to spay or neuter your specific breed of dog.

 

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